Things To Do In Puerto Rico With Kids

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things-to-do-in-puerto-rico-with-kids bikerentpuertorico

Things To Do in Puerto Rico with Kids

Puerto Rico Family Vacations are budget-friendly trips to the NY Times 2019 #1 Place To  GoPuerto Rico is easy-to-reach from the United States by plane or cruise ship. No  passport is necessary to fly here. 

The beaches are beautiful and the water is crystal clear and warm. Meet friendly people everywhere you go and experience delicious and authentic foods found no where else in the world. There are so many things to do in Puerto Rico:

  • Biking in Condado / San Juan Metro
  • El Morro Castle in San Juan
  • El Yunque Rain Forest & Nature Preserve
  • Snorkeling in Fajardo
  • Manatee Beach

Bikes for Eveyone + Bike Trailers for Kids and Pets and Cargo

BIke Rental for Kids in Condado
Kids Bike Trailer Rental and Jogging in Condado
Bike Trailer Rental foe Cargo in Condado

Contact or Call

(787) 497-0007

Castillo San Felipe del Morro

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Visit Castillo San Felipe del Morro in Old San Juan Puerto Rico

Castillo San Felipe del Morro also known as Fuerte San Felipe del Morro or Castillo del Morro, is a 16th-century citadel located in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

On the northeastern-most point of the islet of Old San Juan, Castillo San Felipe del Morro is named in honor of King Philip II of Spain. The fortification, also referred to as el Morro or ‘the promontory,’ was designed to guard the entrance to the San Juan Bay, and defend the Spanish colonial port city of San Juan from seaborne enemies.

In 1983, the citadel was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in conjunction with the San Juan National Historic Site. Over two million visitors a year explore the castillo, making it one of Puerto Rico’s leading tourist attractions. Facing the structure, on the opposite side of the bay, a smaller fortification known as El Cañuelo complemented the castillo’s defense of the entrance to the bay.

-Wiki

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The images in this post are taken by Mark Derho. Please feel free to use freely to promote Puerto Rico without attribution; but not represented as your original content for sale (i.e. you may not sell these images). Social media sharing, reference and attribution is appreciated – please attribute Bike Rent Puerto Rico.

ASOCIACION DE FOTOPERIODISTAS DE PUERTO RICO

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Images from the ASOCIACION DE FOTOPERIODISTAS DE PUERTO RICO

The gallery contains reproductions of powerful original photographs no display at the ASOCIACION DE FOTOPERIODISTAS DE PUERTO RICO – reproductions by Mark Derho.
 

Things to Do in Puerto Rico

When considering things to do in Puerto Rico, we enjoyed an interesting and free historical tour of the ASOCIACION DE FOTOPERIODISTAS DE PUERTO RICO installation, in August 2018.

We were particularly moved by the beautiful and poignant protest photos, and images of the Puerto Rican people bravely protesting authoritarian rule, and being tear-gassed for peacefully protesting.


 

Dr. Bailey K. Ashford

Dr. Bailey K. Ashford cured approximately 300,000 Puerto Rican’s (1/3 of Puerto Rico population) of Hookworm and saved their lives.  – Wiki

 
Colonel Bailey K. Ashford (September 28, 1873 – September 10, 1934) was an American physician who had a military career in the United States Army, and afterward taught full-time at the School of Tropical Medicine, which he helped establish in San Juan.

A pioneering physician in the treatment of anemia, while stationed in Puerto Rico Ashford organized and conducted a parasite treatment campaign against hookworm, which cured approximately 300,000 persons (one-third of the Puerto Rico population). This reduced the death rate from associated anemia by 90 percent. He was a founding member of the Puerto Rico Anemia Commission

 

Ashford Residence

In his honor, the main avenue in the San Juan, Puerto Rico district of “El Condado”, bears his name as does Ashford Presbyterian Community Hospital, also in Condado. His home in Condado, the Ashford Residence is being preserved and renovated and currently houses the ASOCIACION DE FOTOPERIODISTAS DE PUERTO RICO.

In 1941, The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, established the “Bailey K. Ashford Medal”. This is awarded for distinguished work in tropical medicine to a worker in his or her early or mid-career. The first person to receive the award was Lloyd E. Rozeboom. The medal is awarded every year, and more than one award may be given.

Dr. Ashford died on September 10, 1934, in his home in San Juan. His remains were interred in Puerto Rico National Cemetery in the city of Bayamón.

Puerto Rico Rights of Cyclist and Obligations of Drivers

Capital of Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico Rights of Cyclist and Obligations of Drivers- Law 22 of 2000

 Special thanks to Michael Juarbe – Director Of Government Affairs at Puerto Rico Hotel & Tourism Association.

(Vehicle and Transit Law Chapter 11 ) – English Translation

Article 11.01. – Basic rule. (9 L.P.R.A. § 5321): The provisions of this Law relating to the transit of motor vehicles and drivers of them will cover and be applicable to bicycles and their drivers, except those provisions that by their nature are not applicable to them. Bicycle drivers they will have the obligation to drive with due care and caution on public roads.

Article 11.02. – Public politics. (9 L.P.R.A. § 5321a) It is declared as a public policy of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico to provide the conditions that allow and promote the use and enjoyment of the bicycle as a means of transport or recreation. As part of the implementation of this public policy, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico will have the following responsibilities:

(a) Educate drivers of vehicles or motor vehicles about the obligation to share the public road with cyclists.

(b) Educate cyclists about the obligation to comply with the rules established for the use and Enjoy all public areas.

(c) Enable public buildings with adequate locations located near entrances to park the bicycles.

(d) Motivate people and all citizens in general, to use the bicycle as a means of transport.

(e) Improve and increase the quality of data related to bicycle accidents.

(f) Amend those laws that place cyclists in a disadvantageous position in comparison with drivers of vehicles or motor vehicles.

(g) To guide law enforcement officials, judges and prosecutors on the content of this Chapter.

(h) Identify and improve the streets, roads and roads in such a way that they can be used by the cyclists.

(i) Plan and develop exclusive lanes of bicycles such as parallel roads or alternate routes to a controlled access road.

Article 11.03. – Use of bicycles on Puerto Rico Public Roads

[Note: Section 10 of Law 24-2017 repealed the previous Article 11.03 and replaced it with a new one] In relation to the use and handling of bicycles on public roads, the following will be illegal acts:

(a) Carrying a bicycle with more passengers than seats has the same.

(b) Carry packages or objects protruding from the ends of the handlebars or the ends front and rear of the same and that prevent the driver to keep at least one hand on the handlebar of the bicycle.

(c) Running away from the edge of the curb or right bank of the public road, being required to Any person who drives a bicycle through a taxi zone should stay as close to the right bank of the public road that is possible, and exercise due caution when passing a vehicle that is stopped or one that is traveling in the same direction, except on roads or sectors of the shooting area that would have been reserved for the exclusive use of bicycles.

(d) That a person traveling on a bicycle, similar vehicle or toy vehicle will hold onto or one said vehicle to another on a public road.

(e) To ride a bicycle on a public road without it being provided with a bell or other device capable of emitting an audible signal at a distance of one hundred (100) feet, except that no bicycle can be equipped with a siren, nor will any person use a bicycle that It would have been equipped with this class of devices.

(f) Use unnecessarily the timbre or other device that requires subsection (e) of this Article in the urban area.

(g) Running on sidewalks or elevated structures intended exclusively for the passage of pedestrians

(h) Do not carry, during night hours, a white light in the front part capable of emitting a white light visible from a distance of not less than five hundred (500) feet in front and one light or red reflector on the back, which should be visible from any point included in the a distance of one hundred (100) feet to six hundred (600) feet from the back of the bicycle when This is directly illuminated by the low headlamp lights of a vehicle of engine. A lantern can be used that emits a visible red light from a distance of five hundred (500) feet of the back of the bicycle in addition to the red reflector.

(i) Driving a bicycle with defective brakes unable to stop the braking wheels on the dry, flat and clean pavement.

(j) Driving a bicycle if you are not sitting in a permanent and regular seat that has been attached to it.

(k) Driving a bicycle on public roads or recreational centers without being provided with a helmet protector that meets the requirements established by regulation by the Secretary, in keeping with with the standards of the American Standards Association for helmets, published on 1 August 1966, according to whether they are updated, amended or replaced.

(l) It is further provided that:

(1) Any cyclist carrying a child under the age of four (4) or less than a passenger of forty (40) pounds must be loaded into a specially designed seat that protect from the moving parts of the bicycle;

(2) No child shall remain in the special seat of the bicycle, unless the cyclist is in immediate control of it;

(3) The owner of a bicycle sales business may not sell any bicycle that does not have a permanent identification number attached or engraved in its structure, nor may rent a bicycle to a child under the age of sixteen (16) if he or she does not have a protective helmet or provide one at the time of renting the bicycle. In addition, it will provide written information in Regarding the rules on bicycle use established in this Act, and maintain a record where the receipt of said information is recorded. Any person who violates the provisions of this Article, will commit an administrative fault and will be punished with a fine of one hundred (100) Dollars. Any person who violates the provisions of this Article, will commit an administrative fault and will be sanctioned with a fine of one hundred (100) dollars. In the event that as a result of the violation of any of the provisions herein established, causing a vehicular accident or any accident where a pedestrian is involved, the administrative fine will be five hundred (500 dollars).

Article 11.04. – Letter of Rights of the Cyclist and Obligations of the Driver. [Note: The Section 11 of Law 24-2017 repealed the previous Article 11.04 and replaced it with a new one] The people who practice the sport of cycling have the following rights and obligations. Drivers, on the other hand, have to comply with the obligations that detailed in this section. This part will be known as the Bill of Rights of the Cyclist and Obligations of the Driver.

(A) Bicycles Rights of the Cyclist in Puerto Rico:

(1) Every cyclist has the right to ride a bicycle on any public road, be it a street, a road or a state or municipal road, except that you will not ride a bicycle on a road with controlled access, highway or where prohibited by the Secretary of Transportation and Works Public for reasons of security. to. Public knowledge of said permitted and prohibited areas will be given.

(2) The cyclist has the right to use the right bank of the taxiway of the public road and it will be the obligation of every driver of a vehicle or motor vehicle to exercise due Caution when passing him. However, every cyclist will have the option of using the right ride in those public roads where the same is in transitable conditions.

(3) Every cyclist has the right to use the lane width, as long as the lane is traveling on a public road through the urban area at the same speed as a motor vehicle.

(4) Every cyclist has the right to make any type of turn or change of direction in a public road, as long as you carry out the necessary hand signals.

(5) Any group of two (2) or more cyclists has the right to use the designated lane for slow vehicles matching two (2) in two (2). However, this group of cyclists has to drive at least the minimum speed allowed to the motor vehicles that transit on that public road, so that it does not obstruct the free flow of traffic. Will be obligation of every driver of a motor vehicle to exercise due caution when passing.

(6) Every cyclist has the right to drive the bicycle on the right sidewalk or the portion of the public road destined to pedestrians in any of the following circumstances: (a) To stop, stop or park. (b) To accelerate before entering a public thoroughfare. (c) To evade a motor vehicle stopped on the right side or to make a turn to the right. (d) To allow another vehicle that passes faster to pass. (e) When allowed by a public order official. (f) To avoid an accident.

(7) Every cyclist has the right to drive the bicycle on the left sidewalk or the portion of the public road destined to pedestrians in any of the following circumstances: (a) To decelerate or stop if vehicles and traffic or other traffic have been stopped circumstance prohibits or does not allow safe transit on the right side of the taxiway. (b) When authorized by a public order official. (c) To avoid an accident.

(B) Bicycle & Obligations of the Cyclist in Puerto Rico

(1) Every cyclist shall comply with all applicable provisions of this Act. Special emphasis on: i: do not pass red lights ii: not driving low effects of alcohol, drugs and / or controlled substances

(2) Every cyclist will use the bike lane, as long as one is available and the same one is in transitable conditions.

(3) Every cyclist will drive the bicycle in favor of traffic in the right lane of the public road.

(4) Every cyclist shall make the hand signals, as defined in Article 6.17 of this Law, when it is going to stop or when it intends to make any type of change or change of address.

(5) Every cyclist will ensure that his bicycle is in optimum condition to travel in a public road.

(6) Any cyclist or driver who so wishes may voluntarily contribute an amount of money to the special fund created in Article 23.02-g for the benefit of the trauma rooms authorized by the Secretary of Health. This amount is in addition to the mandatory charges of this law.

(C) Obligations of the Driver Every person who drives a vehicle or motor vehicle on the public highway has to fulfill the following obligations in relation to cyclists:

(1) Every driver of a vehicle has the obligation to yield the right of way, reducing speed or stopping if necessary, to any cyclist who is crossing the taxi zone at a point where there are no traffic lights installed or they are not working.

(2) Every driver of a vehicle must leave a space of three (3) feet between the right side of his vehicle and the cyclist when he has to pass. It will not happen to a cyclist when vehicles approach in the left lane in the opposite direction.

(3) Every driver of a vehicle that will pass to a cyclist on his or her right has to verify that he has given at least ten (10) feet between the back of his vehicle and the cyclist before returning to the lane. . It will not happen to a cyclist if he is going to do a dubbing right immediately after passing him. You must always assume that the cyclist will continue to travel in a straight line, unless he shows signs of the opposite. When making a turn to the left, every vehicle driver has to give way to a cyclist who is in transit, just as he would with other vehicles.

(4) Every driver of a vehicle or motor vehicle shall take all precautions to avoid rolling over or causing accidents to cyclists, and special precautions must be taken when the weather conditions are not favorable. In addition, you should be patient with the cyclists and allow them the necessary space to transit, just as you would with other slow vehicles.

(5) Every vehicle driver will avoid blowing his horn when approaching a cyclist. On narrow roads and in cases of emergency and at a safe distance, you should alert your proximity with a brief touch of your horn.

(6) Every vehicle driver will take all necessary precautions before opening the doors of your vehicle so as not to cause accidents to cyclists. Any person who violates any of the provisions of subsection (B) of this Article shall incur in administrative fault and will be sanctioned with a fine of one hundred (100) dollars.

Any person who violates subsection (C) of this Article shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and convicted, he will be punished with imprisonment for a term not greater than six (6) months, penalty of a fine of not less than five hundred (500) dollars nor more than five thousand (5,000) dollars, or both penalties at the discretion of the court.

The violation of this Article that results in serious bodily injury or death to the cyclist, will be considered a felony with a term of imprisonment of eight (8) years and five thousand (5,000) dollars fine without prejudice to the fact that the person may also be accused under the provisions of Chapter VII, if applicable, or under the applicable provisions of the Penal Code.

The Commission for Traffic Safety, the Department of Transportation and Works Public, the Police and the Authority will carry out an educational campaign through the media of information to guide the public on the provisions of this Chapter.

This educational campaign must include, among others, the creation of a particular link in the cyber pages of the Department and the Commission for Traffic Safety on the Letter of Rights of the Cyclist and Obligations of the Driver so that the citizenship is informed and unfortunate accidents can be prevented. This link will be an interactive one through which Citizenship can visually and aurally learn how to act correctly when driving a motor vehicle through the filming area while sharing the same with a cyclist.

So too should include tips for cyclists and drivers on how to share our public roads in a safe way. In addition, the Department will offer a workshop to applicants to obtain driver’s licenses, as well as to all persons or organizations that so request, in which they are offered details and statistics related to the Bill of Rights of Cyclists and Obligations of the Driver.

Likewise, it will publish electronically and in brochures copies of said letter of rights and obligations.

Bicycle Bill of Rights of the Cyclist in Puerto Rico

Article 11.06. – Puerto Rico Bicycle Educational Campaign. (9 L.P.R.A. § 5324)

The Commission for Traffic Safety, the Department of Transportation and Works Public, the Puerto Rico Police and the Highway and Transportation Authority will carry out an educational campaign through the media to guide the public about the provisions of this Chapter. This educational campaign should include, among others, the creation of a particular link in the cybernetics web page of the Traffic Safety Commission on the Bill of Rights of the Cyclist and Driver Obligations so that citizens are informed and can be prevented lamentable accidents. This link will be an interactive one through which the citizenship of visual and auditory can learn how to act correctly when driving a motor vehicle through the shooting area while sharing the same with a cyclist. So you should also include tips for cyclists and drivers how to share our public roads safely.

Introduction to the History of Puerto Rico

History of Puerto Rico

Learn About the History of Puerto Rico Before Visiting

Introduction to the History of Puerto Rico is the gathering of information about an American Story – both interesting and inspirational to people that want to support this wonderful interlaced community!

In 1898, following the Spanish–American War, the United States acquired Puerto Rico under the terms of the Treaty of Paris. The treaty took effect on April 11, 1899.

 

Many local people I’ve met have expressed mixed-feelings about the status of Puerto Rico as US Territory or a potential US State. – Mark

 

History of Puerto Rico / USA

Puerto Ricans are by law citizens of the United States and may move freely between the island and the mainland.[25] As it is not a state, Puerto Rico does not have a vote in the United States Congress, which governs the territory with full jurisdiction under the Puerto Rico Federal Relations Act of 1950.

 

Indigenous People History of Puerto Rico

Originally populated by the indigenous Taíno people, the island was claimed in 1493 by Christopher Columbus for Spain during his second voyage. Later it endured invasion attempts from the French, Dutch, and British. Four centuries of Spanish colonial government influenced the island’s cultural landscapes with waves of African slavesCanarian, and Andalusian settlers. In the Spanish Empire, Puerto Rico played a secondary, but strategic role when compared to wealthier colonies like Peru and the mainland parts of New Spain.[22][23]

 

The Capitol of Puerto Rico

Capital of Puerto Rico
Capitolio_de_Puerto_Rico Wikipedia Creative Commons

 

Safety-first Bike Rental

Who likes to ride bikes safely in San Juan Puerto Rico?

Inexpensive Things To Do in Puerto Rico

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“¡Para compartir nuestro amor por Puerto Rico y Ciclismo!”.

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There Are Many Enchanted Things To Do in Puerto Rico

Have you made your “Things to do in Puerto Rico” list yet? There are so many wonderful things to do in Puerto Rico – aptly known as “The Enchanted Island”! You can also see more of Puerto Rico with a beach cruiser bike rental than you would by just walking.

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Start with the Amazing Weather

80’s and gorgeous all of the time, barring storms.

SAN JUAN PUERTO RICO

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Here’s a few of MARK’S favorite Puerto Rico Sightseeing experiences.

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Mark’s Favorite Things To Do in Puerto Rico … so far!

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1. Snorkeling in Culebra

We had so much fun that we went back again, and again.

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2. Jet-Skiing in Santurce, Puerto Rico

See the GoPro Video from Mark Jet-Skiing in Santurce in 2016!

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3. Sightseeing at El Yunque Rainforest

We were fortunate to see the rainforest before the hurricane.

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Puerto Rico is Amazing by Any Name

Puerto Rico is Spanish for “Rich Port” – officially the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico or “Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico”. The literal translation is “Free Associated State of Puerto Rico”, and was briefly called Porto Rico. The wonderful island is an unincorporated territory of the United States and is located in the northeast Caribbean Sea, approximately 1,000 miles (1,600 km) southeast of Miami, Florida.

An archipelago among the Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico includes the main island of Puerto Rico and a number of smaller ones, such as Mona, Culebra, and Vieques.

The capital and most populous city is San Juan, where Bike Rent Puerto Rico is headquartered. The official languages are Spanish and English although Spanish dominates in the local culture while English is most-popular among tourists.

The island’s population is 3.4 million approximately. Puerto Rico’s culture and history, tropical climate, natural scenery, traditional cuisine, and tax incentives make it a destination for travelers from around the world.

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The Enchanted Island also welcomes more than 6-million tourists annually. bike rent puerto rico recommends a premium yet cost-effective Beach Cruiser Bike Rental or a guided San Juan Bike Tour, if you are visiting Old San Juan. Mention this blog post online or on social media, then show it to us and SAVE 20% inside the store!

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Knowledge of History Leads to Authentic Experiences

Are you more interested right now in the History of Puerto Rico?

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Priority Coast Beach Cruiser Bike Rental

The Best Beach Cruiser Bicycles available anywhere in San Juan for rental (2019).

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Best Beaches in San Juan Puerto Rico

best beaches in san juan puerto rico

Best Beaches in San Juan Puerto Rico

You will have to determine your favorite destination from among the best beaches in San Juan Puerto Rico… when you get here. Please send me any questions, comments or images. Share this page or content at will!

San Juan local citizens (and anyone) with opinions about which are the best beaches in San Juan Puerto Rico, please share 1-1 by calling (787) 487-0007.

Five Best Beaches NOT actually in San Juan Puerto Rico

Isla Verde Beach – Carolina, Puerto Rico.

Flamenco Beach – Culebra, Puerto Rico.

Pozo de Teodoro – Isabela, Puerto Rico.

La Playuela (Playa Sucia), Cabo Rojo.

Domes Beach – Rincon, Puerto Rico.

Gilligan’s Island – Guanica, PR.

 

San Juan, Puerto Rico’s capital and largest city, sits on the island’s Atlantic coast. Its widest beach fronts the Isla Verde resort strip, known for its bars, nightclubs and casinos. Cobblestoned Old San Juan features colorful Spanish colonial buildings and 16th-century landmarks including El Morro and La Fortaleza, massive fortresses with sweeping ocean views, as well as the Paseo de la Princesa bayside promenade.